Eligible

Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld 9781400068326

publication date: 2016
pages: 488
ISBN: 978-1-4000-6832-6

In Eligible, Sittenfeld deliberately and explicitly created a modern retelling of the Jane Austen classic, Pride & Prejudice. Basically, Sittenfeld took the Bennet family, along with the Lucases, the Collins, Fitzwilliam Darcy (of course!), and everyone else, and plopped them into Cincinnati, Ohio, in 2013.

If you’re not already familiar with the story, Pride & Prejudice centered around the Bennet family – including the five Bennet sisters: beautiful and sweet-tempered Jane, witty Liz, uncaring Mary, complacent Kitty, and Lydia, the baby. Living with the five sisters were their often out-of-touch parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bennet. The main plot complications of the story stemmed from Mrs. Bennet’s attempts to get all five of her girls married off, and moneyed.

Sittenfeld followed this main plot almost exactly, but she included many modern devices, like pre-marital sex and techies from Silicon Valley. Sittenfeld also did a satisfying job of carrying over the personality traits of each of her characters. However, she kept each of the characters modern and not as though they were throwbacks from an older time. For example, Jane was still sweet, but she wasn’t a pushover and she wasn’t just sitting around waiting to get married. Possibly the most effective character was Mr. Bennet. Sittenfeld aptly portrayed his dry, almost mean, humor and approach to life. Here was a perfect example:

[T]he door opened, and there appeared a male nurse in aqua-colored scrubs . . . “Fred!” The nurse said, though they had never met. “How are we today?”

Reading the nurses’ name tag, Mr. Bennet replied with fake enthusiasm, “Bernard! We’re mourning the death of manners and the rise of overly familiar discourse. How are you?”

Sittenfeld also perfectly kept intact a major theme of the original: that when we allow our pride and our prejudices to shadow our lives, we do ourselves a disservice.

Along with the modern retelling, Sittenfeld included several current issues, such as race, sexuality, the gender spectrum, and single motherhood. Sometimes Sittenfeld could get a little preachy on these subjects, but generally the book, especially the character of Liz, handled these topics well, in a Liz Lemon white-guilt sort of way.

The book also paid homage to Jane Austen in a subtler way: Sittenfeld captured something true about humanity through her characters, dialogue, and story. Here was a small example:

Liz said, “I guess I’m a Cincinnati opportunist. In New York, I play the wholesome-midwesterner card, but when I’m back here, I consider myself to be a chic outsider.” Even before Willie replied, Liz felt the loneliness of having confided something true in a person who didn’t care. Still, when he spoke, it was more disappointing than she’d expected.

He said, “That chili we had – I liked it okay, but I keep burping up the taste of it.”

I genuinely liked this book. It was cute, fun, and compelling. For those of you who liked Pride & Prejudice, I would recommend this just for the novelty of it. For anyone else, this is a contemporary story with vital characters and plenty of wit.

4/6: worth reading

Other reviews:

New York Times
The Guardian
Entertainment Weekly

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