Turtles All the Way Down

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green9780525555360

publication date: 2017
pages: 304
ISBN: 978-0525555360

Reading John Green can be frustrating. Not because I don’t enjoy it, but because I do. I enjoy everything of his, including Turtles All the Way Down, I’ve read. But, every line, every teary ending, seems calculated to make me feel exactly as I’m made to feel, and that’s annoying.

Turtles All the Way Down, like every John Green book, followed a teenage protagonist as she navigated school and the adults in her world. The book also introduced a love interest and, of course, an adventure. What made this book different, besides the updated cultural references — Green mentioned Wikipedia, dick pics, and mass incarceration, just to name a few — is the main character, Aza Holmes, and her narrative. Aza had anxiety and OCD. Green wrote her as a response to the fictional characters — Sherlock Holmes being perhaps the most famous — that romanticize the kind of obsessive mental thought processes that can characterize mental illness. For example, Aza made this observation while her mind was uncontrollably whirring around:

Madness, in my admittedly limited experience, is accompanied by no superpowers; being mentally unwell doesn’t make you loftily intelligent anymore than having the flu does. So I know I should’ve been a brilliant detective or whatever, but in actuality I was one of the least observant people I’d ever met. I was aware of absolutely nothing outside myself on the drive to Daisy’s apartment building and then to my house.

Aza’s inner monologue sometimes made for very intense reading. The narrative would become a fractured consciousness stream when Aza was having a particularly bad thought spiral. However, in general, the writing was what I’ve come to expect from Green: pithy and accurate sayings about life that are simply itching to be Pinterest memes. Green stuck with this format, I assume, because he is so good at it. The book was full of quotable lines:

Anybody can look at you. It’s quite rare to find someone who sees the same world you see.

And:

Wealth is careless — so around it, you must be careful.

And:

You don’t get to be in anything else — in friendship or in anger or in hope. All you can be in is love.

This book was just classic John Green. If you like him, you’ll like Turtles All the Way Down. If you’ve never read him, imagine a precocious and often accurate teenager lecturing you about life while also asking you to check your privilege from time to time.

4/6: worth reading

other reviews:

New York Times
Los Angeles Review Of Books
Slate

Carry On

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell97812500495512

publication date: 2015
pages: 517
ISBN: 978-1-250-04955-1

Carry On was another entrant in the “Chosen One” category, a la Harry Potter, Frodo, and countless other (usually YA) novels wherein a main character is given Herculean tasks and, after many trials and tribulations, completes them. However, our hero Simon Snow wasn’t necessarily the wizard any of us would have chosen for the job. He’s a self-proclaimed “thug” who thought more about food than magic. In fact, Rainbow Rowell precisely and perfectly constructed characters that broke the mold of the genre. A girlfriend who was enamored with the bad guy. A mentor who was never around to counsel because he was off raiding people’s houses in a costume and a funny mustache. A wizarding world with cars, and laptops, and smart phones.

Rowell’s characters were superb and maybe the best thing about a very good book. I loved how realistic they were. Her characters went through shoplifting phases at 14. Some cursed, some drank, some fell in love and lust. And some just wanted out of the game entirely. This book reflected real people who just happened to be magic, and Rowell did a great job of crafting and describing her characters. For example, Simon’s girlfriend wasn’t interested in waiting around for him to complete his destiny:

‘I want to be someone’s right now, Simon, not their happily ever after. I don’t want to be the prize at the end. The thing you get if you beat all the bosses.’

And, as mentioned above, Simon was kind of a lovable doof. Here’s a description of Simon through the eyes of his roommate:

[Simon] likes to be the first person down to breakfast, Chomsky knows why. It’s 6 A.M., and he’s already banging around our room like a cow who accidentally wandered up here.

Beyond creating wonderful characters, Rowell created, as she always does, a wonderful love story. I won’t get too much into the identity of the characters, but Rowell created two young men whose relationship seemed like a remarkable inevitability. Rowell had a talent of focusing on the minute details of the people in love, without being overly descriptive or maudlin. For example, here’s a description of Simon from the guy who had a crush on him:

[Simon] swallows. [He] has the longest neck and the showiest swallow I’ve ever seen. His chin juts out and his Adam’s apple catches – it’s a whole scene.

Beyond the adorable love story with its delightful minutiae, the plot itself was actually quite good. There were twists and turns and several times where I was in suspense. Rowell crafted a story with sensible internal rules, solvable mysteries, and several believable villains. However, the few flaws in the book came from the plot. There were scenes that were muddled and character motivations that relied on suspension of disbelief to make any sense.

Overall, Rowell created an affectionate parody that perfectly satirized this beloved genre, while still creating characters and a story that will probably be a beloved part of the genre canon.

5/6: seek this book out

Other reviews:

Npr
Slate
Girl!Reporter